Comparison of Free Games for Linux

Linux-gamers.net has a great comparison of free software shooters on Linux.

There have been many free software first-person shooters (FPS) projects over the years, from modded Doom and Quake engines to enhance the existing games (ezQuake, EGL, ZDoom), to free art packs such as OpenQuartz or OpenArena. In 2002, along came Cube, a single and multiplayer FPS based on its own engine, including artwork, maps, models and an ingame map editor. In the freeware (and Linux compatible!) world a little-known game called Legends, a Tribes-inspired game, appeared yet remained closed-source. Filling the FPS gap in the open-source world has usually been left up to commercial companies who release their games with Linux support (i.e. Doom3, Unreal Tournament 2004, Loki Software’s work) or freeware games produced by commercial studios(i.e. America’s Army, Wolfenstein: Enemy Territory) or simply running Windows games run via wine. In the last few years a few built-from-scratch community-based FPS projects, most built on the GPLed Quake engines, have popped up, among them are Tremulous, Alien Arena, Nexuiz, and War§ow. Some have kept their art assets under a closed license (War§ow), while others have also released their art under an OSS license (Nexuiz), I consider both categories free software since well, software refers to programs, code and procedures, not artwork. For this comparison, we’ll take a look at active, robust and community-developed free software shooters. Most released free software shooters are designed for multiplayer, a logical step for a game developed in an online community, however most also feature a bot-based single-player mode. While others have compared such games before, this feature seeks to be a little more thorough and go a step further, ranking the following seven games: Alien Arena, Nexuiz, OpenArena, Sauerbraten, Tremulous, War§ow, and World of Padman. In ranking these games, gameplay, design, innovation and presentation (in that order) will be held as primary criteria.

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Alternative Linux Desktops

Theres a great article by Jack Wallen that covers two alternative Linux window managers, Fluxbox and AfterStep.

Desktop customization in Linux is very flexible; from the ultra-modern KDE and GNOME window managers to with the likes of Fluxbox and AfterStep, there’s a Linux desktop to suit everyone. Jack Wallen covers some of your Linux desktop options.

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Replacing Windows with Linux

There is a great article written by Ashton Mills at APCMag titled SUPERGUIDE: The Open Source Challenge. How to replace Windows completely with Ubuntu.

Ashton essentially delves into the article with the assumption that Windows does everything we need, and explores the possibility of Linux and open source measuring up with a rating system.

When I was first given this task I had to sit and blink a few times, if for nothing else than dramatic pause. I’m a self-confessed Linux nut, as some of you may know, but even I’m cautious to do away with Windows completely. There’s a reason I have a dual-boot Windows and Linux machine. Several of them, in fact.
But have I just been conditioned into using Windows because of past experience, or applications, or file formats, or the myriad other reasons that make Windows a comfort zone because it’s all so familiar?

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5 Ways to run Windows Applications in Linux

As we all know, one of the major concerns for a user switching from a Windows operating system to a Linux distribution is what Windows software will work on Linux as well as how it can be done. Many users stray away from running Windows because of the simple fact that some must needed Windows applications can not perform under Wine. Tristan Rhodes, The Open Source Advocate has a nicely written article describing 5 ways to use Windows applications in Linux.

  1. Use an open source alternative instead
  2. Buy a commercial product that was designed for Linux
  3. Use Wine to run the application in Linux
  4. Run Windows in a Virtual Machine
  5. Run the application on a remote Windows system

Click here to find out more details for each method of running Windows applications Linux.

5 Advantages of using Linux over Windows

So, you’re a new, or fairly moderate Linux user, who wants to know what the true advantages of Linux over Windows are? There are several advantages of Linux, and of course, some disadvantages to using the Linux operating system. This article covers 5 advantages of using Linux over Windows, and lists a few disadvantages as well. Continue reading

Alternatives to Windows Programs

There are many alternatives to using Microsoft Windows and the applications that are made for it. One of the more popular alternatives is the Linux operating system. Just about everything you can do in Windows, you can do in Linux, sometimes even better and with more control. Linux has been around for quiet a long time, so its no surprise that there are a ton of applications out there that offer the same type of functionality that many of our favorite Windows applications have. This article takes a look at some of the most popular software applications used in Microsoft Windows and compares them with some alternatives that get the same job done. Continue reading