Speed up your Linux System with Preload

Techtrob writes:

Preload is an “adaptive readahead daemon” that runs in the background of your system, and observes what programs you use most often, caching them in order to speed up application load time. By using Preload, you can put unused RAM to good work, and improve the overall performance of your desktop system.

Check out some of the numbers,

Application “Cold” Startup Time Preloaded Startup Time
Desktop Login 30s 23s
OpenOffice.org Writer 15s 7s
Firefox 11s 5s
Evolution 9s 4s
Gedit Text Editor 6s 4s
Gnome Terminal 4s 3s

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Initial Slackware Configurations

There are many settings I find myself adjusting after every Slackware installation I complete. This article takes place immediately after an installation of Slackware 11, logged in as root for the first time. Here are some of the settings I adjust: Read the rest of this entry

Modify SSH Config To Maximize Security

SSH is a powerful remote logging protocol that took the place of telnet back in the mid-to-late 90′s. With so many people using SSH as an every day tool, it is important for server administrators to understand some ways of making the secure shell a bit more… well… secure. In this article you will learn how a few simple configuration modifications to sshd_config on your SSH server can improve the security of your SSH daemon and allow you to sleep better at night…

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Simple Samba Slackware Setup

If you are wanting to connect your Windows machine(s) to your Linux machine(s) over your network, then Samba is what you need. Essentially, Samba allows your Linux machine to communicate with your Windows network to share files, resources, and printers. This document will cover the steps of installing and configuring Samba on Slackware 11.0.0. Read the rest of this entry

Setting up a Syslog Server

One very important aspect of computer security and hack prevention is the collection and assessment of system log files. In the mind of a hacker, when gaining unlawful entry to a system their first instinct is to cover all traceable tracks. This means deleting log files and possibly even setting up backdoors to enter again at will sometime later in the future. It is important, as a system administrator, to ensure that even if your system has been broken into or tampered with, that you have traceable evidence to figure out exactly what went wrong, and where it went wrong. Hackers tend to tamper with system logs making this sometimes impossible to figure out. Setting up a remote syslog server for all of your servers to send their logs to is how we can ensure that your logs will be completely accurate and un tampered with.

The syslog server configured in this example is an old 486 with an 8GB hard drive, running Slackware Linux 10.2. However, the configuration and commands will work for just about any Linux distribution.

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SSH + Screen = Easy Administration

I have access to a numerous amount of Linux machines for work and personal matters. Instead of having a ton of different SSH or PuTTY windows open, each connected to a server that I administrate, I decided to use screen to connect to all of them, and manage each one in a different screen window.

Before getting into my screen configuration, its also important to note that on top of my screen setup, I have also configured SSH to authenticate via SSH keys, so I wouldn’t have to always type the password when admining from my “playbox”.

Here is how I set up SSH keys.

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