In a mailing list post dated September 8th, Ubuntu founder Mark Shuttleworth announced plans for Ubuntu 9.04 Jaunty Jackalope, scheduled for release in April, 2009.

Shuttleworth starts out by making a bold statement that we can expect Ubuntu to be shipping on millions of devices by next year, thus setting the bar very high for Ubuntu in order to compete with the major players, Microsoft and Apple.

Goals of Ubuntu 9.04 Jaunty Jackalope

Mark also lays out two specific goals that Jaunty Jackalope will have.  The first being faster boot time and faster resume time.  I really think this is a great area for Ubuntu 9.04 to address.  Boot time can certainly be improved and would make the experience of Ubuntu that much better.  The second goal will be to work towards blurring web services and desktop applications.  “Is it a deer? Is it a bunny? Or is it a weblication – a desktop application that seamlessly integrates the web!”

This release looks promising and I really can’t wait to start testing the beta versions.

As for now, Ubuntu 8.10 is scheduled to be released next month, so I’m looking forward to the Intrepid Ibex for now.

Linux Timeline

Check out this time line of all the popular Linux distributions to date. You can see what the first Linux distro was that came from GNU/Linux, MCC Interim, and what each distribution is based off of, like Slackware is based off of SLS, and SuSE is based off of Slackware.

Pretty cool stuff.

Lets face it, there are so many Linux distributions available these days that deciding which Linux distro to use without trying every single one can be a daunting task.

Each Linux distribution contains the same base Linux kernel and system tools, but what makes a distribution unique is how things are packaged and managed. Research is the most important thing a Linux user can do when choosing the right Linux distribution. This document hopes to provide you with the necessary resources and information to make the choice that is right for you. So, how do you find out which Linux distro to choose?

  1. DistroWatch

    • DistroWatch is a website that displays top rated (popular) distributions along with newly added distributions and releases. You can find extensive comparison charts, reviews, download links and various other information specific to each distribution. This site is a must visit for anyone looking for a Linux flavor that suits their needs.
  2. Live CD’s
    • Check to see if the distribution you are planning on installing has a Live CD. This will give you the opportunity to test out features before committing valuable time and hard drive space.
  3. Distro Chooser

    • This website contains a straightforward 10 question quiz that may help you narrow your research. I have not tested the output more than twice, so I’m unsure as to which distributions the creator has as optional answers. I answered the questions to the best of my ability and the quiz answered Slackware as the number 1 operating system that fits my criteria.
  4. Choosing a Linux Distribution

    • This article has some decent recommendations for which distributions to use if you’re a new Linux user, if you’re a power user, if you’re planning on installing Linux on a server, an old computer or installing Linux for games.
  5. Comparison of Linux distributions

    • The comparison charts and information on this wikipedia page are put together very nicely. There is a ton of information on each Linux distribution located here, including history, features, technical aspects and more. Take some time to learn about some of your choices before making the jump.

Additional Tips/Resources On Choosing:

  • Make a list of what you want to accomplish and what you will be doing on Linux. Check off each item as you find out the distribution is capable.
  • Check out the activity in the community related to your distribution. Look on IRC, forums, and mailing lists and ensure that you’ll be able to seek help easily.

Conclusion:

These tips and resources are provided to help you choose the perfect distribution for your needs. Typically, the most important needs a user should desire are: ease of use, flexibility, support, and security. Remember, try out Live CD versions of distributions before you install a full copy so that you can get a feel of how things are laid out. Use these resources to your advantage and you’ll be operating on a distribution that fits all of your needs in no time. Good luck!