“2 Million Songs From More Than 180,000 Artists and Over 20,000 Labels, Including EMI Music and Universal Music Group”

Wow.

If you haven’t heard already, Amazon.com has launched a public beta of Amazon MP3, a digital music store offering customers a huge (see above) selection of DRM-free MP3 downloads, encoded at 256 kilobits per second, priced from 89 cents to 99 cents, with CD’s as low as $4.99.

What is DRM?

Digital rights management (DRM) is basically a technology that aims to limit the use of digital media, in this case, mp3′s, or digital music. An MP3 that contains DRM is supposed to restrict you from copying the file, or converting the file to other formats. Online music stores tend to adhere to DRM technologies by restricting usage of music purchased and downloaded.

Check out the DRM wiki for more information.

Check out this post for a quick review by GigaOM of the service.